Adventures in Streaming: What Happened to Monday?

* reviews of things i found on (mostly) netflix *

* now with spoilers *

What Happened to Monday is a sci-fi futuristic film starring Noomi Rapace as all seven main female characters, and Willem Dafoe as their grandfather. In a world where over-population has forced a government restriction on having children, anyone with more than one child is obliged to give the “extra” children to the government to be put into stasis until such time the Earth can handle the extra people again.

The girls’ mother as well as countless others are affected by the genetic modification of food crops, resulting in multiple-child pregnancies. The girls are septuplets, left with their grandfather after their mother dies in childbirth, and he names them each after a day of the week; they can each go out in the world on the day that matches their name, and they all play one person: Karen Settman (their mother’s name). Needless to say, debriefing in the evening becomes incredibly important, as the next girl has to know what her sister did as Karen the day before.

One day Monday doesn’t return in the evening, and the movie revolves around the other girls’ investigation of her disappearance. They have to be incredibly sly and careful, so that no one realizes there are seven people posing as Karen Settman – if they get caught, they’ll all be put in stasis. The government – represented by Glenn Close – also has reason to hide the discovery of seven siblings surviving to adulthood, since this would undermine their image of authority over the child restriction.

The story itself is really good, although the twists aren’t entirely unprecedented in film; the acting is incredible, especially from Ms. Rapace, who plays basically eight people – all seven sisters plus their hybrid Karen persona. Each girl is easily identifiable by personality as well as differing hairstyles, etc. Glenn Close does an excellent job at being both the big-bad-government person with horrible secrets and also a human being who was making what she thought was the best choice for humanity. That character-trope isn’t exactly new, but she brings plausibility to it – we actually believe she was doing her best, even as we’re horrified by some of the secrets that come to light.

There’s some stark depiction of death – not particularly gory, but it feels a little more real because of its simplicity and abruptness. The film quickly brings us in to the story, so we’re suitably tense when anyone comes close to discovering the girls’ secret. Chase scenes are equally engaging. Nothing is wrapped up in a nice bow, but the ending is decently happy and answers the questions. Willem Dafoe is fantastic at being a loving father figure who needs to make tough choices to protect his granddaughters’ lives – each girl has to be able to look like the same Karen Settman every day, so if one of them, say, loses a finger in a careless skateboard accident, then they all have to sacrifice a finger (it’s not easy living in a dystopian future).

The futuristic tech is fairly believable as not being that far ahead of where we are now, although the tech used for the “put them in stasis” part is comparatively way more advanced, so a tiny bit of disconnect there.

The story would still have been solid without the hard-hitting actors, but they really bring it to the top. The social situation – the ethics of restricting people’s child-bearing – is addressed in the summed-up, sort of offhand manner that a lot of dystopian sci-fi addresses such things, but not so egregiously that we feel let down about it. The slate-grey colour scheme of the rest of the film is countered by the seven girls’ varied and colourful fashion choices, illustrating how they’re the counterpoint to the government’s sterile, soulless mentality. The effects – especially when some or all of the girls are present in a scene – are seamless. Everyone’s characters, even the secondary and tertiary characters, are real and not oversimplified or used as stereotypes. We don’t get to know each sister as much as we may have wanted to, but one of the points of the film was how little the girls ultimately knew about each other, so it was actually important that we didn’t know too much.

Overall, as long as you’re not hoping for a sugary-sweet wrap-up, What Happened to Monday? is well worth watching.

popcorn icon  10 out of 10