Adventures in Streaming: The Sea of Trees

* reviews of things i found on (mostly) netflix *

* now with spoilers *

The Sea of Trees is the story of a Arthur (played by Matthew MacConaughey) who has planned a trip to the Aokigahara Forest in Japan; although he doesn’t seem particularly unhappy, and even looks around him as though the city and countryside were captivating, he is obviously coming to the Suicide Forest to end his life. Before he can take action, however, he encounters Takumi (played by Ken Watanabe) who is desperately lost, wandering around trying to get out of the forest. He’s injured and exhausted, but he’s changed his mind about killing himself and now just wants to return to his wife and child.

Arthur decides to help Takumi, leading him toward the trail he had just taken to get into the forest. Somehow, though, the trail has disappeared, and Arthur has become as disoriented as Takumi. The two men spend many hours together, searching for a way out. As they get to know each other, talking about the reasons they had come there in the first place, we see a series of flashbacks to Arthur’s life with his wife Joan (played by Naomi Watts). Through these flashbacks we come to understand why Arthur wanted to die, but we also want both men to find joy in living again.

Both Matthew MacConaughey and Naomi Watts are good actors who, therefore, are extremely effective at playing people who are difficult to like. When the flashbacks began, and I saw the two of them in a fairly rocky marriage, I almost gave up on The Sea of Trees, because I didn’t want to watch two gut-wrenching hours of their marriage devolving into suicidal mutual loathing. But I continued anyway, already curious about whether or not Takumi would make it home, and I was glad I stayed with it: the flashbacks ultimately portray a very real couple who are working through some difficult times in the best way they know how. They turn into people we can like, and it makes it even more tense then, to wonder what brought him from that home and marriage with Joan to a place where he could end it all.

The Aokigahara Forest, both physically and culturally, has strong spiritual significance, allowing the characters to have possibly otherworldly experiences that might have seemed contrived or ironic in a Western setting. The juxtaposition of flashbacks from that Western world with the dark beauty of the forest is a perfect metaphor for Arthur’s struggle between trying to die and wanting to live. Ken Watanabe conveys a lot of emotion with few words. The connection between Arthur and Takumi is genuine and believable, from the moment Arthur decides to help him. Arthur’s and Joan’s characters are well fleshed out without making the story-telling ponderous or overly maudlin. The various mysteries surrounding all three characters keep us interested, and the final reveal is truly rewarding.

The Sea of Trees is definitely worth watching.

popcorn icon  10 out of 10.