Adventures in Streaming: Belief

* reviews of things i found on (mostly) netflix *

* now with spoilers *

Belief: The Possession of Janet Moses, based on true events, describes the exorcism of Janet Moses by the members of her family.

The family, residents of Wainuiomata, New Zealand, are depicted as loving, intelligent, and deeply embedded in their religious faith. We see the sometimes problematic aspects of blending newer faiths with their more traditional faith and cultural traditions. We also see how much they care about Janet, and how sincerely they felt her to be possessed by a demon.

The pacing isn’t too bad, although it’s sluggish in some places. The complex faith of the family is presented with respect and sensitivity; in fact, the viewer can see all too well the logic of the family’s decisions regarding possession and exorcism. By the time events get out of hand, they’re all predicated on so many smaller steps that it seems almost impossible to change course.

There was a lack of discussion in the documentary about the wisdom of exorcism – even within the context of cultural and religious respect, it would have been nice to hear a bit more from others in the family or community who felt differently about it than the family. It created an atmosphere of cultural assumption – as though anyone in this region would have done exactly the same – that I think is not particularly accurate, given the ultimate controversy about the exorcism.

One striking part of the documentary is toward the climax of events, when the family is circling the wagons in a desperate attempt to finally rid Janet and another family member of their demons: the girl screams, “You’re scaring me!” and one of the family screams back, “You’re scaring me!” This expressed sentiment in particular did make the exorcism feel like less of an event of faith and more of an event of hysteria, although the family is always represented as believing entirely in their interpretation of the behaviour, and acting for what they truly felt was Janet’s well-being.

Overall, the documentary is well-done and fairly matter-of-fact; it’s not for the faint-of-heart, but it’s worth watching.

popcorn icon  8 out of 10