Adventures in Streaming: Casting Jonbenet

* reviews of things i found on (mostly) netflix *

* now with spoilers *

Casting Jonbenet is a documentary that looks not so much at the events and investigation surrounding Jonbenet’s death but rather at the opinions, feelings and perceptions of those who are auditioning to play various parts in the movie-documentaries about her.

Various facts about her death are presented as well as a timeline of investigation, and we see a lot of images of Jonbenet – at her pageants, a few family photos. The investigation is chronicled in a passive way as we hear from the actors auditioning to play the various roles – for instance, while talking to the men who are trying out to be Jonbenet’s father, we hear the facts and suppositions that have informed those men’s opinions about what actually happened.

It’s not action-packed, obviously, but the pacing is good. We never get to learn anything new about the case, which parallels very profoundly the initial event – when we all waited to hear what had happened and eagerly anticipated finding out that her killer had been identified and brought to justice. Some theories are put forth – everyone from her brother to random inmates who claimed responsibility – but DNA from the crime scene excluded these individuals … meaning that there was no proof they did it, but technically a great many things are possible, including that there was more than one assailant. No one theory – even in this expository documentary – ultimately carries more weight than another, and in the end, we’re left with the random statements and observations of people trying out for a part.

These people, though … taken all together, their collective opinions and sentiments paint an interesting picture. Especially as we watch the little girls who are trying out to be Jonbenet herself, it’s striking that we don’t really hear as much from these girls as we do from the older actors – of course we don’t, since the actors trying out to be Jonbenet are very little children, and may not even fully understand that they’re portraying a real person who died. Even with the supplementary information about the case and the investigation and all the competing new and old theories, it becomes quickly clear that people “remember” the case with the things that they supposed and surmised and felt about it at the time, rather than the factual particulars. In the end, we see why it’s “casting” Jonbenet – because we have no more handle on what happened, really, than we would if it were a made-up case in a show where the director wants to keep the audience guessing. Most importantly, even though this was a real event and Jonbenet was a real little girl, her story has crossed over more into legend than history, so much so that any new actual evidence would likely not affect people’s predetermined notions about what happened.

The little Jonbenets don’t say much, being five or six or seven years old … and that’s striking too. We can’t speak to the only person, besides her killer(s), that knows what happened that day, because she’s dead. We couldn’t speak to her before that either, particularly, because she was so little. I think that’s why her case was so compelling to follow even in its sadness – we wanted to know what had happened to her, we wanted to be able to protect her somehow even though it was too late, we wanted to know what happened so we could prevent it with other little people in our lives who were also too little to talk. But we didn’t get to know. The people auditioning for parts in the docu-movies don’t get to know. In the end, we’re left with no more information than a lot of us already had about the case … and the image of a little girl dancing who doesn’t say anything to us.

Casting Jonbenet is a really effective emotional parallel to the case itself, and an interesting look at how facts get subverted by our perceptions of them. Overall, it’s well-done and worth watching.

popcorn icon  8 out of 10.